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Mechanical Engineering - 2019 Senior Design Abstracts

Christopher Fishman (ECE), Christian Gaya (ECE), Raymond Klouda (ME), Thomas O'Neill (ME) and William Pisani (ME)
SAE Hybrid Vehicle: Battery Box and Management System

Recently, efficiency and performance have become increasingly important in auto racing. Because of this, future engineers are moving toward hybrid and electric solutions. The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) hosts an annual competition for schools to showcase student car designs. To keep up with the shift to hybrids, the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering SAE team wanted to compete in 2023 with their own formula hybrid car. Our project added to last year’s project by focusing on the electrical parts. This included batteries and a battery management system (BMS) protected within a box. 

The BMS checks the battery’s state of charge, power and temperature. The project features included cooling and analysis of the box, as well as combining the batteries and the BMS. The cooling consists of two fans circulating air throughout the box. Box analysis made sure it would stand up to impacts and verified that box temperature would not exceed dangerous levels. The batteries and BMS were wired together and tested to ensure proper compatibility. All parts properly fit together when used in a simulation tool before building. The finished product was a small-scale physical model and a digital full-scale model for a specific electric motor.

Team (L to R):
Christopher Fishman (ECE), Christian Gaya (ECE), Raymond Klouda (ME), Thomas O'Neill (ME) and William Pisani (ME)
Advisor(s):
William Oates, Ph.D., P.E.
Sponsor:
Cummins Engine Company
Bryce Lankford, Nicholas Ajhar and Marissa Jackson
Mobile Anechoic Test Chamber

Danfoss Turbocor needs a way to measure the noise levels of their TT series compressors. Therefore, we engineered a test procedure and test stand that would integrate with the current manufacturing surroundings to accomplish Danfoss Turbocor’s needs.

The selected procedure measures sound pressure and converts the data to sound power. People are most familiar with sound pressure because pressure waves created by sounds and noises in the environment are heard via the ear drum. Sound power measurements accommodate for the environment the measurement is collected in, and are not dependent on the distance from the sound source. Therefore, sound power will allow Danfoss Turbocor to effectively communicate the compressor’s noise levels to potential customers.

Danfoss Turbocor has an established testing facility, so the team needed to integrate the testing equipment into fixed infrastructure without disrupting the current production flow. Our design includes an array of microphones arching over the test stand to measure the compressor’s sound pressure. The array is on a sliding track to allow movement to different positions, which allows for production flow and flexible recording positions. Once the microphone array is used to measure the sound pressure, the a computer program we developed converts sound pressure to sound power and creates a report Danfoss Turbocor.

Team (L to R):
Bryce Lankford, Nicholas Ajhar and Marissa Jackson
Advisor(s):
Eric Hellstrom, Ph.D.
Sponsor:
Danfoss Turbocor
Hui Xu, Elijah Beard and Joshua Boyd
High-Speed Shaft Assembly System

Danfoss Turbocor has created a project to assemble high-speed shafts for their TT series compressors. The TT series compressors are used by the HVAC industry to heat and cool large places crowded with people and equipment, including schools, offices and factories. 

Danfoss Turbocor is the first to develop oil-free compressors that run with shafts floating inside magnetic bearings. Danfoss Turbocor’s product lets the shafts in the compressors run up to 40,000 rpm, which is more than 10 times that of a car. These high speeds mean that assembling a balanced, strong and perfectly aligned shaft is important for the compressor’s performance. 

A shrink-fitting process is used to assemble the shafts whereby bearing sleeves are heated in an oven so that they expand and then pushed onto a smaller shaft with a press before the assembly cools. The bearing sleeves shrink as they cool which means they will form a tight grip around the shaft, completing the shaft assembly. 

Presses are expensive machines, so being able to use a small press saves money. The required press pressure is related to the sleeve temperatures because the sleeves expand when they heat up. If the sleeves expand enough, they will slip around the shaft without applying any pressure. We calculated this temperature so that a smaller press can be used, lowering assembly costs, increasing worker safety and helping avoid parts damage during the assembly. Safety equipment, including a Plexiglas guard around the press, a safety lock and insulated gloves, will be used to protect the press operator. The assembly process will be safe, simple and straightforward.

Team (L to R):
Hui Xu, Elijah Beard and Joshua Boyd
Advisor(s):
Patrick Hollis, Ph.D.
Sponsor:
Danfoss Turbocor
Cassie Roby, Daniel Lane, Sara Steele, Kyle Barber and Danny Carlos
Smart Integration of Climatic Chamber Operations

Danfoss Turbocor wanted improved data capture and communication methods. We designed the Smart Integration of Climate Chamber Operations, which allows access to three types of test data (sensor data, power failures and live test video), from anywhere in the world.

Our project consists of a smart network and an observation system. The former connects both climate chambers and data loggers to the Danfoss server, enabling remote access. The latter uses cameras to watch the chamber during testing and connects chamber videos to the server. Camera video is available live and recorded for review later. The final design is a small-scale model of the floor plan.

In the first stage, the team understood how the climate chambers and data loggers connect to the internet. This is important before users electronically access chambers. On the model, 3D printed pieces represent the new network and wires represent connections. In the second stage, the team researched possible cameras able to withstand the extreme environment of the climate chamber. 

Using insulation lessens the cost of the camera necessary to withstand the extreme temperature range (-98˚F to 364˚F) for at least 10 years. A small screen displays live video so test engineers receive error messages directly and can visually watch tests in progress.

Team (L to R):
Cassie Roby, Daniel Lane, Sara Steele, Kyle Barber and Danny Carlos
Advisor(s):
Neda Yaghoobian, Ph.D.
Sponsor:
Danfoss Turbocor
Ben Leathers (ME), Christopher Murphey (ECE), Celeste Chauhan (ECE), Andreas Hennings (ME) and Alexander Sharp (ME)
NASA Student Launch

The purpose of this project is to build a rocket and rover for NASA’s Student Launch Competition. This competition resembles a NASA mission where a rocket flies to another planet. After landing, the rocket deploys a rover to collect a soil sample for testing. 

The project goal is to design and launch a rocket equipped with a rover for the competition. The rocket must safely carry the rover to a height of 4900 feet. A smaller parachute deploys to control the landing of the rocket and a larger parachute deploys later to slow the rocket down before landing. The rocket takes 90 seconds to descend and lands within 2500 feet of the launch pad. When the rocket lands, the team sends a signal to release the rover. This is the only part of the competition when the team actively controls any of the vehicles. 

After the rover exits the rocket, it moves 10 feet away without any user commands. Finally, the rover collects and seals a 3 ounce soil sample. The team uses devices that can read the height of the rocket and determine when to release parachutes. The rover uses a simple method to collect soil: the container drags behind the rover to scoop the soil. A few parts of the rocket and rover are 3-D printed to cut down on costs. The team also kept the rocket motor and frame from last year’s project to save money.

Team (L to R):
Ben Leathers (ME), Christopher Murphey (ECE), Celeste Chauhan (ECE), Andreas Hennings (ME) and Alexander Sharp (ME)
Advisor(s):
Rajan Kumar, Ph.D.
Sponsor:
Florida Space Grant