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Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering - 2019 Senior Design Abstracts

Sophia Hawkins, Kyle Rhodes Maricarmen, Arjona Sanchez and Alberto Chacin

Fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) is a common material used to make everyday products including boats and airplanes. In 2017, 2.5 billion pounds of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) material was produced. Unfortunately, there is currently no way to economically dispose of or recycle FRP waste. The 2.5 billion pounds of GFRP produced in 2017 will never decompose and there are no current plans for its recycling. 

In addition, the global construction industry is consuming more sand to use in concrete than the planet can produce. This is causing the price of sand to increase while also destroying aquatic ecosystems. In the future, finding a replacement for sand in construction applications will become a large issue. Our ground-up GFRP will take the place of some of the sand in concrete mixtures and reduce the impact of construction on the environment. The goal of our project is to prevent unused plastics from entering landfills and to ease the dependence on sand for construction concrete.

We took powdered waste GFRP material and used it to replace some of the sand in concrete. We hope for the waste GFRP to enhance the structural properties of the concrete. However, if the new concrete mix only meets the structural properties of standard concrete, we will still be preventing waste from going to landfills. As an added bonus, our concrete mix is less expensive than what is currently available and can be used in many structural applications.

Team (L to R):
Sophia Hawkins, Kyle Rhodes, Maricarmen Arjona Sanchez and Alberto Chacin
Advisor(s):
Zhiyong Liang, Ph.D., Michael Devine, Ph.D. and Raphael Kampmann, Ph.D.
Sponsor:
FAMU-FSU Engineering
Hao Zhang (ME), Yue Yu (ME), Hanqing Zhao (ECE), Samantha Krauss (IME) and Marcus Lockwood (IME)

The oil palm tree is a very profitable and useful resource. Its fruit is harvested and used to make palm oil. The traditional methods for collecting the fruit are either climbing the tree and cutting the fruit with a hand-saw, or cutting it with a saw on the end of an extended pole. Both of these methods are inefficient and unsafe. The tree’s height compounds the danger of harvesting the palm fruit. These trees can grow up to 40 feet tall and are not very stable when there are winds.

Our project goal was to increase the safety of the palm fruit harvesting process by providing a machine which removes the fruit using a ground-based mechanism. To achieve that goal, we produced a working palm oil harvester prototype that is safe, stable and automatically controlled.

The machine has a dolly-like transport base with an attached saw on an extendable post. Cable pulleys elevate the post and saw and an aluminum ring serves as a saw track. The fruit-cutting tool is lightweight and has its own detection device. 

Our harvester features motors to automate the saw-lifting mechanism and a utility cable apparatus to ensure the machine’s stability. The cable wraps around the tree trunk to keep the saw in place during high winds. 

Computer-aided designs of the machine and simulation software determined the best structure for the harvester. Ultimately, our device helps standardize the palm oil harvesting industry by improving the safety and efficiency of fruit collection.

Team (L to R):
Hao Zhang (ME), Yue Yu (ME), Hanqing Zhao (ECE), Samantha Krauss (IME) and Marcus Lockwood (IME)
Advisor(s):
Okenwa Okoli, Ph.D., CEng, CSci Md and Abu Shohag
Sponsor:
FAMU-FSU Engineering
Mark Fredrikson, Alejandro Pichardo, Keri Dziwulski and Andrew Reiter

Brassieres are necessary for women in order to provide support for their breasts and a comfortable lifestyle. Unfortunately, research and case studies report that women are often lacking adequate support and experiencing displacement of breast tissue. This is an ongoing issue especially with well-endowed women. 

Current sizing only takes into account two measurements: band size and peak bust. These limited measurements cause women to purchase an incorrect bra size. Our Math-Based Brassiere Design Team proposed a change to the brassiere sizing method. 

We used MATLAB programming language to create a new sizing algorithm with redefined measurements. We researched and analyzed breast measurement data to develop key formulas within the algorithm. To design our mathematical model, we used regression analysis, a technique that uses multiple variables to build a relationship among them. We derive the cup size from a volume range rather than a differential between band and bust size. Breast volume is calculated using band size as well as three new measurements that can be found with a simple tape measure. Upon inputting these few measurements, the algorithm outputs the correct brassiere size for women and ultimately provides a comfortable feeling.

Team (L to R):
Mark Fredrikson, Alejandro Pichardo, Keri Dziwulski and Andrew Reiter
Advisor(s):
Okenwa Okoli, Ph.D., CEng, CSci and Taniwa Ndebele
Sponsor:
FAMU-FSU Engineering
Abdiel Puello Lopez, Anthony Sartin, Celine d’Adesky and Raquel Werner Albert

Dedicated Crowley crewing coordinators are responsible for onboarding the replacement mariners on all their government vessels. Whether assigning a stewardess or a captain, the crewing coordinator is accountable for verifying all certifications, documents, and training requirements are met before the mariner boards their vessel. The goal of this project is to develop an application using Microsoft PowerApps, Flow and SharePoint to streamline crewing coordinators’ onboarding process. 

Previously, all crewing coordinators used their own individualized spreadsheets in Excel to complete verification checks. The coordinators only had access to their work files and databases from computers. With the new application, crewing coordinators can access necessary files and databases from their tablets and smartphones, making it easier to work no matter where they are. 

We used a Six Sigma DMADV (Define, Measure, Analyze, Design and Verify) product development process to ensure the application’s ease of implementation and use for all crewing coordinators. The DMADV process also ensures that the application includes all features that Crowley deemed necessary. The application provides all crewing coordinators with a uniform method to complete the onboarding process, a pain-free way to request travel authorizations directly from the app and a means to stay connected on the go.

Team (L to R):
Abdiel Puello Lopez, Anthony Sartin, Celine d’Adesky and Raquel Werner Albert
Advisor(s):
Okenwa Okoli Ph.D., CEng, CSci and Beth Gray, M.S.
Sponsor:
Crowley Maritime Corporation
Daniela Solano, Emily Plower, Jacob Smith and John Flores

The City of Tallahassee’s Waste Management and Community Beautification Departments are responsible for providing garbage services, recycling services, maintaining city roads and preserving county parks. The employees drive garbage trucks, recycling trucks and small pickup trucks around the city to accomplish their job, which puts them at risk every day. 

The city is testing a pilot program with Lytx DriveCam, a safety program designed to reduce unsafe driving behaviors and improve fleet performance with video-based coaching.

We served as consultants to provide a data-driven recommendation on Lytx DriveCam or an alternative system. The recommended driver safety system must be an efficient and cost-effective tool that meets all of the city’s requirements. 

To perform a thorough analysis, we collected historical accident data from the city’s Department of Risk Management and from Lytx competitors. We evaluated Lytx DriveCam and compared it to competing systems, using cost and safety analysis, along with regression models to determine the best driver safety program for the city’s 130-vehicle fleet. 

Based on the analyses, the Lytx system will reduce the average number of accidents and associated costs, while exceeding other customer requirements. We ultimately recommended the city purchase Lytx DriveCam, which saves the city money and increases the safety of their citizens and drivers.

Team (L to R):
Daniela Solano, Emily Plower, Jacob Smith and John Flores
Advisor(s):
Beth Gray, M.S. and Geoffrey Adams
Sponsor:
City of Tallahassee